Chapter 13 summary to kill a mockingbird. To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 13 Summary 2019-01-06

Chapter 13 summary to kill a mockingbird Rating: 4,2/10 208 reviews

To Kill a Mockingbird: Summary & Analysis Part 2: Chapters 12

chapter 13 summary to kill a mockingbird

Aunt Alexandria explained that Jem and Scout were growing up and that she and Atticus thought it would be a good idea if she helped. Scout steps on something while climbing into bed, and, with Jem, discovers Dill hiding under her bed. Jem said that yes he did and explained that Atticus had told him that Joshua S. When Scout returns home from church, she find Aunt Alexandra has come to visit their home. Atticus feeds Dill, but tells him that he needs to contact his Aunt Rachel. Scout even has to ask Atticus what the word 'rape' means. Scout and Dill decided to forgive Jem mainly because Dill had to sleep in the same room as him.

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To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 13 Summary & Analysis from LitCharts

chapter 13 summary to kill a mockingbird

To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 13 Summary By Harper Lee The beginning of this chapter starts off directly where the last chapter left off. Dill says that they would buy him all sorts of stuff but never give him attention. This calls to mind the encounter with Burris Ewell earlier in the novel and his rude treatment of Miss Caroline. Atticus tried to shut her up by saying the Finches could be made fun of because they were known for marrying cousins. Jem slapped her and punched her to the stomach which sent her to the ground. She knocks on Jem's adjoining door to ask him about it, and he goes to get a broom in case it's a snake. Curious about the trial, Scout asks her father what rape is.


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To Kill a Mockingbird Chapters 12

chapter 13 summary to kill a mockingbird

The Tom Robinson case is affecting everyone, especially the Finches, as they deal with hatred and anger towards Atticus's involvement. Jem tells Atticus-despite Scout's protest- and Atticus goes next door to tell Dill's aunt, Miss Rachel. Literary Themes Part Two is a turning point for To Kill a Mockingbird in a number of ways. Scout asks if she can go with Calpurnia again, and Aunt Alexandra is outraged. Jem is older now, and Scout is having a harder time relating to him, causing them to fight more frequently. He then tries to make light of the whole situation to cheer the children up. He makes a valiant attempt but succeeds only in making Scout cry.

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To Kill A Mockingbird: Chapter 13 Summary

chapter 13 summary to kill a mockingbird

In addition, Lee introduces the black community at a crucial moment in the narrativeā€”just as race relations in Maycomb are thrown into crisis by the trial of Tom Robinson. She takes this personally, like he is becoming more of a parent than a sibling. Atticus came to the door way. Late at night Scout was woken by Dill. He tells her, 'Scout, try not to antagonize Aunty, hear? One night Scout remembered that she wanted to ask Atticus what Rape meant. Scout and Jem begin to notice that where they go about town, people seem to be whispering about them. Expecting it to be the sheriff and his crew, Scout jumps out of hiding to greet them.

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To Kill a Mockingbird Chapters 12

chapter 13 summary to kill a mockingbird

. They are worried that a group of people intent on lynching Tom Robinson may intercept his transfer. Scout has never seen anything like their church before, and marvels at how the Church doesn't even have hymns. Unexpectedly, she steps on something that she believes is alive. Jem told Scout to wait on top of the bed and Jem made a tentative swipe under the bed. Jem joked that that must make the Ewells high class because they had lived behind the dump for 3 generations.

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Notes on Chapter 13 from To Kill a Mockingbird

chapter 13 summary to kill a mockingbird

When he had said that, Scout had felt like the old Atticus was back. Scout is fairly oblivious to issues of race so, in her mind, the Ewells are incredibly low-class, so she can't understand how their word holds any merit. Remarkably, Calpurnia doesn't lament the African-American position in Maycomb society or try to explain prejudice to the children. To add to Scout's disappointment, Dill won't be coming to Maycomb this summer, although Calpurnia eases her loneliness somewhat. Scout and Jem's surprise helps readers understand this unfairness at a deeper level. However, just as every white resident of Maycomb isn't prejudiced, not every member of Calpurnia's church is, either.


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To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 14

chapter 13 summary to kill a mockingbird

One thing leads to another, and Scout tells Atticus about how she went to Church with Calpurnia. The novel also continues to reveal the ugly underbelly of Maycomb. He has been unhappy with his life and the lack of attention his parents have been giving him, so he took himself on the train to Maycomb. However, Jem and Scout lack the pride that Aunt Alexandra considers commensurate with being a Finch. Jem and Scout rushed to greet Atticus and Scout asked Atticus if he brought her home a book and if he knew Aunt Alexandria was there. Alexandra moved right in and made herself at home, and soon enough it seemed as if she'd lived there forever.

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To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 14

chapter 13 summary to kill a mockingbird

With school out, Scout's real education will begin again. After giving a very legal definition of rape that clears up nothing for Scout, Atticus asks why Scout doesn't ask Calpurnia. Finally, Aunt Alexandra arrives to live with them, seemingly unannounced. Atticus came in and separated them. Dill made up this long elaborate story about how he crossed the country on foot and was tied in chains etc. The members of First Purchase Church-an all black church-are generally very inviting to Scout and Jem. It becomes very apparent in this section that Jem is becoming further distanced from Scout in terms of growing up.

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To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 13 Summary

chapter 13 summary to kill a mockingbird

Analysis The third and final summer chronicled in To Kill a Mockingbird begins in these chapters. She tells Scout to stop scratching her head. Scout asks Dill why he ran away, and he says it isn't because his parents are mean, but that they just don't want him around. Simply because of their racial prejudice, the townspeople are prepared to accept the word of the cruel, ignorant Bob Ewell over that of a decent black man. Scout is angry at him for not taking her side and fights him. Defiant of her aunt, Scout turns to her and says, 'I didn't ask you! That night Atticus finally came home from working with the State. As he had talked, he had realized the ludicrous request Alexandra had made on him and his children and told them to ignore what he'd said.

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