My mistress eyes sonnet. Shakespeare's My Mistress' Eyes Are Nothing Like the Sun... 2019-03-06

My mistress eyes sonnet Rating: 4,2/10 914 reviews

Shakespeare Sonnet 130

my mistress eyes sonnet

Sounds like a creepy doll, like Shakespeare meets the Bride of Chucky. Then, at the end, he changes his tune and tells us about his real and complete love for her. To the same extent that many romantic poets exaggerate the beauty of their mistresses, insisting that their eyes are more beautiful than the sun, their hair fairer than hold or their cheeks redder than roses, Shakespeare decides to exaggerate how unattractive his mistress is. Shakespeare can have fun, toy with our ideas, play with the words, and finally bring us back to a really sincere and important point. This is true love which overcomes the decay of age and the test of time.

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My mistress eyes are nothing like the sun (Sonnet 130) by William Shakespeare

my mistress eyes sonnet

And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare And yet I think my love as rare As any she belied with false compare. By hitting us over the head with her very human flaws, the speaker forces us to take a look at our definitions of female beauty. He has been criticizing his mistress, and then, all of a sudden, he starts telling us how much he loves her. That line in particular seems almost openly satirizing the tradition itself, as it is well known that many Elizabethan poets would compare their lovers to things that mortals could not achieve, leaving the realm of human to enter the pantheon of the gods. The rhetorical structure of Sonnet 130 is important to its effect.

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Shakespeare Sonnet 130 Analysis: My mistress' eyes are nothing like (...)

my mistress eyes sonnet

So this is just one more way the speaker scrambles our expectations. One final note: To Elizabethan readers, Shakespeare's comparison of hair to 'wires' would refer to the finely-spun gold threads woven into fancy hair nets. Sonnet 130 is a pleasure to read for its simplicity and frankness of expression. We'll keep this G-rated, but you can see why talking about this woman's breasts forces us to think about how we define an ideal woman, and what seems beautiful about her. And yet, I think she is as rare a woman as any woman who has been falsely compared to these paragons of beauty. Therefore, the imagery used throughout the poem would have been recognizable to contemporary readers of the Sonnet because it was playing with an established tradition that contemporary poets would have made use of quite frequently, so far as to lead it to become cliché. When you put it like that, it makes the whole metaphor i.

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Shakespeare’s Sonnets Sonnet 130

my mistress eyes sonnet

Would you think it was charming if someone wrote this poem about you? A favorite among Shakespeare's sonnets simply because it is so different, so humorous, so unselfconscious. Our speaker will have none of this. He can just tell his mistress, plainly and simply, that he loves her for who she is. I have seen roses damasked, red and white, But no such roses see I in her cheeks; And in some perfumes is there more delight Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks. Poets describe their mistresses' hair as gold wires, but my mistress has black wires growing on her head. I love to hear her speak, yet well I know That music hath a far more pleasing sound: I grant I never saw a goddess go, My mistress, when she walks, treads on the ground: And yet by heaven, I think my love as rare, As any she belied with false compare.


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Sonnet 130: My Mistress' Eyes Are Nothing Like The Sun Poem by William Shakespeare

my mistress eyes sonnet

Most sonnet sequences in Elizabethan England were modeled after that of Petrarch. He's having too much fun to imagine him sitting alone in his room dreaming about her. Even though the speaker eventually says how much he loves her, he has said such nasty things about his mistress that it makes him hard to believe. While Shakespeare was regarded as the foremost dramatist of his time, evidence indicates that both he and his contemporaries looked to poetry, not playwriting, for enduring fame. Analysis: Setting Where It All Goes Down Though no setting is explicitly stated, we're imagining this poem set in a courtroom. Shakespeare talks about her hair, the color of her skin, etc.

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My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun (Sonnet 130) by William Shakespeare

my mistress eyes sonnet

In the couplet, then, the speaker shows his full intent, which is to insist that love does not need these conceits in order to be real; and women do not need to look like flowers or the sun in order to be beautiful. Does he seem to be gently making fun of standard love poetry or is he really attacking it? You know how in magazines women pretty much tend to look the same? Sonnet 130 Love Quotes Quote 1 I love to hear her speak line 9 It takes him more than half of the poem to get there, but the speaker finally says that he loves something about his mistress. I love to hear her speak, yet well I know That music hath a far more pleasing sound; I grant I never saw a goddess go; My mistress when she walks treads on the ground. Shakespeare is pushing the satire just about as far as it will go, dissecting everything about this woman's appearance. Shakespeare utilizes a new structure, through which the straightforward theme of his lover's simplicity can be developed in the three quatrains and neatly concluded in the final couplet.


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Sonnet 130: My Mistress' Eyes Are Nothing Like The Sun Poem by William Shakespeare

my mistress eyes sonnet

Readers in Shakespeare's time would have recognized all these worn-out comparisons as allusions to images in other love poems. Her Hair Symbol Analysis Another major cliché about women's beauty is that their hair should be silky smooth and shiny. Staring down into the canyon the light touched everything as it reached up and sighed in relief. One is of an ideal fantasy woman that he can't begin to believe in, and the other is of the real, imperfect woman he loves. The comedy involves the traditional literary device of moving urban characters into the country where they have to deal with life in a different manner… 953 Words 4 Pages compare thee to a summer's day? We hear a lot about her, but for the most part, the information is rather vague and negative.

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Analysis Of The Poem ' My Mistress ' Eyes Are Nothing Like The...

my mistress eyes sonnet

But in the end, he tells us that he loves listening to her talking and that he finds his own way of loving rare. Sonnet 130 is clearly a parody of the conventional love sonnet, made popular by Petrarch and, in particular, made popular in England by Sidney's use of the Petrarchan form in his epic poem Astrophel and Stella. The rhetorical structure of Sonnet 130 is important to its effect. I love to hear her speak, yet well I know That music hath a far more pleasing sound: I grant I never saw a goddess go, My mistress, when she walks, treads on the ground: And yet by heaven, I think my love as rare, As any she belied with false compare. In the first quatrain, the speaker spends one line on each comparison between his mistress and something else the sun, coral, snow, and wires—the one positive thing in the whole poem some part of his mistress is like. Contemporary poets, such as Sidney and Watson, would use the Petrarchan sonnet for its poetic form, whereas in Sonnet 130, Shakespeare mocks all the conventions of it.


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Shakespeare's My Mistress' Eyes Are Nothing Like the Sun...

my mistress eyes sonnet

Nonetheless, his contemporaries recognized Shakespeare's achievements. Hyperbole Hyperbole is a form of speech that exaggerates the facts in order to make a point. But we're not fans of lame clichés, and we think it's pretty fun to watch Shakespeare go to town on them in this sonnet. In the sonnets, Petrarch praises her beauty, her worth, and her perfection using an extraordinary variety of metaphors based largely on natural beauties. Here he illuminates how everyday events can lead to a greater insight within. Petrarch, for example, addressed many of his most famous sonnets to an idealized woman named Laura, whose beauty he often likened to that of a goddess. In this case, though, spends this poem comparing his mistress's appearance to other things, and then telling us how she doesn't measure up to them.

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Shakespeare’s Sonnets Sonnet 130

my mistress eyes sonnet

When she has a close-up in a particular scene, the camera tends to focus on her skin, her hair, her eyes, her breasts — all the things that Shakespeare includes here. Have you ever felt this way? See why Shakespeare's the poet and not us? I think so, and so I like the sonnet : Thanks for reminding me of the wonderful Sting album! If snow is white, her skin is not — dun is another word for grey-brown; her hair is described as black wires, and she does not have a pleasant flush to her cheeks. It has been a part of lyric poetry for a long time. Metaphors, similes, and hyperboles are very popular figurative language in the writing world. Hyperboles make a poem exciting, they are exaggerated statements and not really meant to be taken literally Metaphors and similes are a big part of Shakespeare 's writing.

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