Seneca falls convention 1848 summary. An Analysis of the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention for Women’s Rights (Fall 2012) 2019-01-12

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Women's rights and the Seneca Falls Convention (article)

seneca falls convention 1848 summary

He has so framed the laws of divorce, as to what shall be the proper causes and, in case of separation, to whom the guardianship of the children shall be given, as to be wholly regardless of the happiness of the women-the law, in all cases, going upon a false supposition of the supremacy of man and giving all power into his hands. The inclusion of intellectually curious heroines in many popular novels by authors of all political leanings of this time period attests to the increased interest in women's minds and not just their bodies. Stanton, Elizabeth Cady, Susan B. News of the convention spread quickly, and newspapers across the United States were commenting on the story. Some women argued for a much more expansive role—educating children and men in solid republican principles, like liberty and justice. After getting married in 1811, James and Lucretia settled in Philadelphia and had six children.


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The Declaration of Sentiments by the Seneca Falls Conference (1848)

seneca falls convention 1848 summary

Controversy was expected, but would not deter their efforts. Elizabeth had been married to Henry Stanton, a lawyer and anti-slavery activist, and they had both picked up and moved from Boston to Seneca Falls due to financial issues. Elizabeth Cady Stanton remained a key figure in the movement throughout the remainder of the century and her life. In entering upon the great work before us, we anticipate no small amount of misconception, misrepresentation, and ridicule; but we shall use every instrumentality within our power to effect our object. In 1870, she co-founded, with Susan B.

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Women's rights and the Seneca Falls Convention (article)

seneca falls convention 1848 summary

Such has been the patient sufferance of the women under this government, and such is now the necessity which constrains them to demand the equal station to which they are entitled. It took place in Seneca Falls, New York during July 19-20, 1848 and was located at the Wesleyan Methodist Church. Resolved, That the women of this country ought to be enlightened in regard to the laws under which they -live, that they may no longer publish their degradation, by declaring themselves satisfied with their present position, nor their ignorance, by asserting that they have all the rights they want. Analyze seventeenth-, eighteenth-, and nineteenth-century foundational U. The plan was to hold a meeting in Seneca Falls, New York where Stanton lived , on July 19 and 20, with follow-up meetings to take place in Rochester, New York.

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What Was Important About the Seneca Falls Convention?

seneca falls convention 1848 summary

Stanton to Editor, Boston Index, 16 October 1876, in P. Anthony, microfilm edition, reel 18, frames 1055-56. As a child, she was a tomboy—a phrase used then and today to describe a young girl who enjoyed sports. In 1878, Stanton drafted the language for a constitutional amendment extending the vote to women. The Seneca Falls Convention was followed two weeks later by an even larger meeting in Rochester, N. Between 1840 and 1848 Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth Stanton kept themselves busy by raising families and continuing to participate at the temperance and anti-slavery movements.


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Seneca Falls Convention, 1848

seneca falls convention 1848 summary

The nineteenth-century women's rights movement focused women's discontent about their social and legal situations and introduced the imperative of political change. Lucretia had been married to James Mott, a Quaker preacher and abolitionist. Stanton, however, proposed one resolution that aroused a great deal of controversy. As a result, she and Lucretia Mott, one of the excluded delegates, discussed the need for a convention that would address the challenges facing women in contemporary society. It was adopted unanimously in the morning session of day 2, July 20.

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Seneca Falls Convention

seneca falls convention 1848 summary

I could not see what to do or where to begin—my only thought was a public meeting for protest and discussion. Stanton's defense of the franchise demand was supported by , the only disfranchised man attending, and after debate the convention passed it. Ultimately the proposal did pass by a narrow margin. And it was in London that Elizabeth Stanton met the Quaker minister Lucretia Mott 1793—1880 , who was to become one of Stanton's most important mentors. Born into an affluent family her father was a judge , she was educated at Emma Willard's Troy Female Seminary.

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Seneca Falls Convention begins

seneca falls convention 1848 summary

Lucretia and James Mott were active in the abolitionist and womens rights reform movements. Many local citizens formed and participated in antislavery societies and temperance leagues, ran stations on the ; they were willing to listen to and participate in a discussion about changing the public roles of women in society. James Mott, Lucretia Mott's husband and a respected Quaker leader, chaired the session. Elizabeth Cady Stanton read a draft of the Declaration of Sentiments and the women discussed and made changes to the resolutions. Even among reformers interested enough to attend the convention, there was still some reluctance about the full scope of women's rights. In 1855 George Pickering Burnham's History of the Hen Fever: A Humorous Record in part parodied the women's rights movement. Despite scarce publicity, 300 people—mostly area residents—showed up.

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Reform in the Early Republic

seneca falls convention 1848 summary

Approximately 100 to 300 people were in attendance, including many men who supported the idea of women's rights. Stanton married another abolitionist, Henry Stanton, in 1840. Hester Prynne in 's 1804—1864 The Scarlet Letter 1850 may be the quintessential American heroine, a character bringing unity to the fragmented women's roles in antebellum America and dreaming of a revolution in religious interpretation and relations between men and women. The Birth of American Feminism: The Seneca Falls Women's Rights Convention of 1848. Softening her social commentary with comedy, Sara Payson Willis Parton 1811—1872 , known as Fanny Fern, used her novel Ruth Hall 1855 and a weekly newspaper column from 1853 to 1872 to satirize social problems, lampoon male tyranny, and demand economic independence for women. On July 19 and 20, 1848, over 300 men and women met at the Seneca Falls Convention in Seneca Falls, New York. Such has been the patient sufferance of the women under this government, and such is now the necessity which constrains them to demand the equal station to which they are entitled.

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